“Rita Dolores” in ImageOutWrite v. 8

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As Max passed between the stanchions he extended his hand to Rita. She strained to elongate her fingers while rotating her wrist, willing her rough hand to appear delicate. She then placed her hand atop his, as if he were about to escort her into a ballroom.  

“Aren’t you a tall drink of water,” she said with theatrical, accented diction, then she drew close to his ear and mouthed an indecent sipping sound. Too embarrassed to reply, Max smiled awkwardly and entered the club.

Rita’s sharp allure on that night in 1986 would come back to Max decades later, opening more than a door. 

ImageOutWrite is the companion volume to the ImageOut LGBTQ+ film festival in Rochester, NY. Volume 8 includes my short story, “Rita Dolores” (p. 75). It’s a little mystery set in NYC featuring a gay crime reporter, a drag performer, and a lesbian coroner. The book is a dense collection of short stories and poems by diverse LGBTQ+ voices.

Condragulations to my fellow contributing authors:

Charlie Bondhus
Mark Boyd
Elaine Burnes
Steven Cordova
Dale Corvino
Kellie Doherty
Dr. Victor Evans
Jamin Favela
Jack Fritscher
Reilly Hirst
Walter Holland
Eddie House
Gregory Gerard
Craig Kirsch
David Lohrey
Laine Lubar
Raymond Luczak
Jennifer Maloney
Jon McDonald
Samantha Panepinto
Steve RE Pereira
Oliver Scialdone
Alan Slotkin
Christopher Stephen Soden
Rick Allen Wilson

I enjoyed how Bondhus’ poem “My Brother Asks…”, (p. 173) invokes “the whole hotbox universe…” in answer to a flip question, and how Elaine Burnes’ short story “Life Time” (p. 39) about a time-traveling butch, queers the conceit.

 

Raunch Daddy on ASMQ Podcast

“Raunch Daddy,” is story #2 from Worker Names, and I read it in its entirety for ASMQ. It’s epistolary in sections, with diary entries and chat room exchanges. Nick’s been kicked out by his lover for being ’emotionally unavailable’ and has lost his job in the recession. He sublets a studio around the corner from his now ex. Facing uncertainty and loneliness, he cruises AOL chat rooms on a pirated WIFI signal. He soon finds that there are men in the chat rooms eager to pay for his company, and embarks on a career as an escort. His friend Dean has also entered into sex work—after getting kicked out of nightlife by the Giuliani administration—and acts as his mentor. Earnest Nick is transformed by his encounters with the titular character, a Mexican novelist with a nose for pleasure & tragedy.

Thanks to Leah at Mischief Media for the production expertise. ***Hello adult content***

https://pod.link/1468551230

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Experiments & Disorders @ Dixon Place, NYC

Writer and activist Elizabeth Koke and I shared the bill for the  9/17 Experiments & Disorders at Dixon Place. Read cuts from the following works-in-progress, and a cut from “Raunch Daddy,” the second story in the Gertrude Press chapbook Worker Names.

  • I Speak for my Difference, a new English translation of the poem Manifesto/Hablo Por Mi Diferencia by Pedro Lemebel, a queer Chilean writer and activist who resisted oppression, authoritarian rule, and the culture of machismo. 
  • Frankie Knuckles Belongs, a braided essay about the National Museum of African-American History & Culture and the late deejay Frankie Knuckles, his art, and how his sound advanced the vision of the gay liberation movement.

 

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Photo: E&D curator Christen Clifford

 

“I think the state will cleave us…” Bruce Benderson Interview in RFD Mag

Last year, a fellow writer recommended Bruce’s workshop to me.  I was familiar with his name but not his actual work. I started reading after joining the workshop, wondering how could I have missed out? I love the voices of the Times Square queer underworld he chronicles in User. His “erotic autobiography, ” The Romanianis a fervent love letter to hustler Romulus. The tract he mentions, Against Marriage, was published by Semiotexte. In Benderson’s prose the erotic, the personal, and the political form a singular sweaty body.

In this interview for RFD Mag Stonewall Issue “Rebellion Feels Delicious.,”  Benderson  offers context to the Stonewall narrative. When  queer people were criminalized, we had common cause with other criminals. Like them, we sought to get away with our crimes, in our case, living our lives. Not to deny that we were exploited, demeaned, endangered in the process. Whatever current aspirations for bourgeois respectability, there are workers and outlaws among us, now as then. Our creative work should reflect these multitudes, not just this largely gentrified projection of today’s queer representation:RFDMag CUT

Night of the Living Dean @ Bedlam NYC

I was on the bill for this celebration of the life and work of Dean Johnson, in support of an upcoming feature documentary  from Lola Rocknrolla.  I opened the second set by delivering the Living Dean Manifesto, and then reading excerpts from “Raunch Daddy,” the second story in Worker Names. From the manifesto:

There was a spiritual component to Dean’s lifelong work, all of it, the parties, the music, the drag, the performance, the hustle. In 2007, the Times quoted me saying,“Dean was a New York landmark, like a tall tower or a tourist attraction.” Today I’m gonna tell you something else about Dean that you weren’t ready for back then: Dean was a Pagan God. His irreverence was absolutely necessary and his fury was holy: Fuck thermo-nuclear war, fuck Mary Tyler Moore (I mean, rest in peace Mary Tyler Moore, but also fuck Mary Tyler Moore.) Big Red was the God in charge of dislodging the Judeo-Christian hold on the sacred, with its tedious cycles of guilt, castigation, and redemption. We are sacred. This gathering is sacred. Music, dance, celebration: sacred. Sex is sacred, drugs are a sacrament, prostitutes and artists are sacred, our naked bodies are sacred, queer people are sacred.

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photos by Joe Hepworth 

Worker Names is a 📖.

 

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My first book, Worker Names, is out. It’s a mini-collection of 3 short stories, See if you can peep the theme:

“Worker Name”:  a wary hustler finds himself in a hostage situation with a yuppie on crack and a Bulgarian hipster boy.

“Raunch Daddy”: an earnest young hustler meets a Mexican novelist with a nose for pleasure and tragedy.

“Traumatic Book Review: Alive, by Piers Paul Read” two former hustlers reunite for a weekend of reckonings in a Vermont summer home.

My thanks to Fiction Judge Brontez Purnell for upping me, my thanks to Bruce Benderson for his kind words.

I’m very proud to have the work of Alvin Baltrop as the cover art. Read more about this pioneering gay African-American photographer here.

Want a copy? Order it for $8.00 + shipping from  Gertrude Press.

Want a signed copy? Hit me up.

Photograph used courtesy of The Alvin Baltrop Trust, © 2010, The Alvin Baltrop Trust and Galerie Buchholz. All rights reserved.

 

 

Gertrude Press announces 2018 Chapbook Contest winners

Gertrude Press publishes three chapbooks a year: poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Their  announcement of 2018’s winners is here.  My entry, a collection of short stories called “Worker Names,” is the fiction winner, and the chapbook is in production.

From “Traumatic Book Review: Alive, by Piers Paul Reed”:

Warner nudged him awake with a bare foot; he looked around to find the library empty. Noting the paperback on his chest, Warner smiled. “Alive. Who knows how that turned up here? Guests in and out, someone must have left it behind…” 

Vin roused. “One of the survivors–Canessa–was my first crush.”

“Ah! Now we know. You’re into jock cannibal trade,” Warner joked, as he gave him a hand up. 

Expected to be released in late March, in time for AWP (and Saints + Sinners).

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“TBR: AbPPR” a 2018 #SASFEST Semifinalista 👸🏽

“Traumatic Book Review, Alive, by Piers Paul Read“, my submission for the 2018 Saints + Sinners fiction contest, made the semifinalist cut.

I read Alive probably too young. I was freaked  out by the fate of the Old Christians rugby team, even while longing for their camaraderie. So I grew up to write a short story exploring lust, shame, body issues, and loss.

Warner nudged him awake with a bare foot; Vin looked around to find the library empty. Noting the paperback on his chest, Warner smiled. “Alive. Who knows how that turned up here? Guests in and out, someone must have left it behind…”

Vin roused. “One of the survivors–Canessa–was my first crush.”

“Ah! Now we know. You’re into jock cannibal trade,” Warner joked as he gave him a hand up.

I’ll be reading at this year’s festival in New Orleans.

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“One Nation” in OutWrite Festival Journal

My short story “One Nation” was published in OutWrite‘s rowdy collection of stories, interviews,  poems, and spells. A young man with a tambourine shows up  for the 2010 rally and figures out the best way he can serve the cause of social justice.

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“Dangit! I missed the bus,” I awaken with a jolt the morning of the rally. The country comes out of me in times of stress. Four years of living in New York City I still can’t figure out the balance between nighttime adventuring and daytime responsibilities. Phone has a mess of texts from my friend Owen. Where R U Qween? being the latest. I was supposed to take the charter with him and his activist crowd. Owen believes we queers must do our part for the broader struggle for social justice. I’ve been crushing on him since he recruited me to the cause one night at the Phoenix.

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“Love Tap” in Queer Sci-Fi Antho 🌈 out today! 🌈

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Karmode2-2. Illustration courtesy of Orangina.

My first foray into sci-fi appears in  Impact, Queer Sci Fi’s fifth annual themed flash anthology. In “Love Tap”, a weary pilot has a run-in with a smug Genético bred for dimensional travel.

“Sorry about that docking business, humano. Still a little groggy from subspace hibernation mode…” He stretched, threw back his shot, and roared. “Can I make it up to you?”

Impact: Queer Sci Fi v. 5

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