Appearing in Chew/Durand’s “Negative Two”

Michela Durand and Daniel Chew are filmmakers examining today’s virtualized spaces, the privately-controlled, pseudo-public platforms of our social media reality.  In their short film Negative Two, the main character Devin is a young architect contemplating corporate plazas (analog pseudo-public spaces) while mediating Grindr exchanges. I play Devin’s older, somewhat inappropriate hook-up.

The film screened at the Shed (itself a corporatized endeavor on city-owned land) in July and has since screened at LA’s MOCA.

The trailer:

A still, in which I go in on lead actor Eric Lee:

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Night of the Living Dean @ Bedlam NYC

I was on the bill for this celebration of the life and work of Dean Johnson, in support of an upcoming feature documentary  from Lola Rocknrolla.  I opened the second set by delivering the Living Dean Manifesto, and then reading excerpts from “Raunch Daddy,” the second story in Worker Names. From the manifesto:

There was a spiritual component to Dean’s lifelong work, all of it, the parties, the music, the drag, the performance, the hustle. In 2007, the Times quoted me saying,“Dean was a New York landmark, like a tall tower or a tourist attraction.” Today I’m gonna tell you something else about Dean that you weren’t ready for back then: Dean was a Pagan God. His irreverence was absolutely necessary and his fury was holy: Fuck thermo-nuclear war, fuck Mary Tyler Moore (I mean, rest in peace Mary Tyler Moore, but also fuck Mary Tyler Moore.) Big Red was the God in charge of dislodging the Judeo-Christian hold on the sacred, with its tedious cycles of guilt, castigation, and redemption. We are sacred. This gathering is sacred. Music, dance, celebration: sacred. Sex is sacred, drugs are a sacrament, prostitutes and artists are sacred, our naked bodies are sacred, queer people are sacred.

DC NotLD Comp
photos by Joe Hepworth 

Gay Sexual Outlaw essay in Daily Xtra

I answered a call for “essays about the moments you saw yourself in pop culture” from Toronto’s Daily Xtra and my essay was accepted. It’s a tribute to Debbie Harry, and a diss on the film it served as theme. it chronicles the effects of hearing Blondie’s genre-crashing track “Call Me” on me at 16.  #RepesentationMatters

I’d taken the lyrics as a sort of instruction manual in the absence of any other. Its beat, repetition, sultry coaxing, and charged inferences accompanied me as I navigated longing.

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Thanks to Natalie Wee for the prompt, and to Natalie and Rachel Giese, Director of Editorial, for the thoughtful and thought-provoking edit.